Archive for February, 2012

Some “braingames” to show that colors, objects, etc. are not simply “given” apart from our cognitive activity

February 17, 2012

This clip from the NatGeo television show, “Braingames,” helps to demonstrate a Kantian point, namely that that colors, objects, etc. are not simply “given” apart from our own cognitive activity.  Instead, what counts as a “color,” an “object,” “size,” or “motion,” etc. depends on our own cognitive activity (or our activity of uniting/synthesizing data) in order to  know objects *as* objects.  This should ‘bake your noodle’ — watch here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GYwPPRDrHI

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Please share your thoughts about the “final” for this course

February 17, 2012

TO: All students in this course
FROM: Michael Baur
Please use the ‘comments’ function below in order to tell me (providing reasons) what sort of work I should assign as a “final” in this course — e.g., a final paper, a final exam, or something else.   Please note: in making a decision about the “final,” I will follow the principle that “silence implies consent” (so if you are silent, I will assume that you consent to ANY decision that I make about the “final”).

Assignment in place of class, Thursday, Feb. 9; do this by noon Sunday, Feb. 12

February 8, 2012

Please note that we will have class on Monday, Feb.13. In the meantime, since we will not have class on Feb. 9, ALL students are required to do the following:
1) by using the ‘comments’ function under this post, raise a serious question (a question of interpretation, or question about the substance of Kant’s philosophy) which you think gets to the heart of Kant’s claims, based on what you have thus far read in the Critique of Pure Reason. Be sure to provide your name at the end of your question.
2) read and re-read the questions posted on this blog by other students, and respond to *at least* one of the questions posted by another student. If you wish, you may also respond to a response given to one of your own questions; in turn, others may respond to your response to the response. In any case, always be sure to provide your name at the end of your response, or response to a response, or response to a response to a response….
3) be sure to keep up with the reading assignments, as outlined on our course syllabus.